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Capi pots and planters: A blooming delight

Capi pots and planters: A blooming delight

Decorating your home inside and outside with plants and decorative pots is an effective way of bringing colour and a sense of freshness into your decor. Adding a splash of vibrancy with your favourite bulbs either indoors or outdoors can complement existing decor or add something new. Finding suitable planters that are weather resistant and lightweight can be quite a challenge, however. Although a multitude of pots and planters exist in numerous shapes, sizes and designs, finding an elegant and neat pot that can be used both indoors and outdoors is rare.

Capi pots are made of moulded fibres and look exactly like stone or concrete pots that we commonly see used to house the soil and roots of plants. Unlike stone, however, Capi pots are lightweight and strong, strong enough to call them unbreakable, while they still maintain the understated elegance that we love about garden pots and planters.

Capi pots

Hadeco wanted to bring a quality product to South Africa. What would be better than the strongest, most appealing, and most functional pots for plants? One giant leap taken over the past year was creating the best selling line featuring a rib and row structure (a woven look). This line is incredible because it comes with a 10-year guarantee, it boasts weather resistance and is easily identified by the orange coloured inner, which is the insulation responsible for creating the stable temperature conditions the plants need throughout the cold and warm seasons.

Potted beauty

While indoor pots are usually smaller and more decorative, outdoor pots are geared at functionality, allowing the plants they contain to deliver their beauty or decorative function. There is a beautiful indoor Capi range, designed to blend with most modern styles of decor and provide insulated and proper containing of indoor plants and flowers. The outdoor Capi range is strong, weather resistant and the double walled edge offers insulation protection for the plant’s roots against the frost of winters, and peaking hot days in summer, favouring a stable and consistent soil temperature.

Love your plants, treat them well

There are numerous benefits to buying Capi planters as opposed to normal pots. Besides offering your plants protection from extreme temperatures, they are also capable of withstanding breakage, we know because they were tested by being dropped from a 5-metre height! They are recyclable and offer a 10-year warranty too, doing their bit for the environment. They are beautiful and create a sense of visual appeal easily too, definitely the container gardener’s dream! Find out more about these innovative planters, or browse and order from our website: http://www.hadeco.co.za/?s=capi&post_type=product

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Natural Capabilities

I don’t know if you are keen on walking but I am. I love the gentle rhythm of a measured plod and the slow passage through a landscape. I particularly delight in the all the things I can see or touch, and the smells: funny bumbling beetles, fluid sjongololos with over-countable, tickly legs like the ones we had in our garden when I was a child, damp earth, curious pebbles and jewel drops of water trapped in the hairs of long grasses. Continue reading Natural Capabilities

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Muscari, from edible delicacy to river of dreams

Every year over 800 000 visitors descend upon Keukenhof Park, just outside the city of Lisse in the Netherlands, during its two-month opening during the spring season. The garden is a rainbow reverie of multi-coloured delight, with around four-and-a-half-million tulips and some three-million other bulbs covering its 32 hectares. Walking along the 15km of pathways of this spectacular petal-bursting showcase is enough to leave you speechless. Continue reading Muscari, from edible delicacy to river of dreams

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Leucojum – making winter white

Dreaming of a powdery white winter? Well, there’s an answer to South Africa’s lack of snow, and it comes in the form of blooming snowflakes – lots of them if you’re lucky. The common name for Leucojum, these living snowflakes may not be conducive to tossing around in snowball fights, but they sure do cover the ground in a magical carpet of glimmering white when grown in the right conditions. Continue reading Leucojum – making winter white

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Lachenalia, the flowering harmony

Have you ever wondered what inspired Mike Oldfield to record his iconic 1973 tune ‘Tubular Bells’? Musos will say it was his percussion instrument of tubular-bell chimes, but we horticulturists are convinced he was paying tribute to the tubular-bell-shaped Lachenalia, also known as Cape cowslip or wild hyacinth. After all, it’s difficult not to be drawn to dedicate music to our fascinating, cutely shaped indigenous plant. Often bi- or tri-coloured, there are over 120 species of Lachenalia from South Africa and Namibia. Just imagine all of these colours dancing in the wind as if swaying to the sound of Oldfield’s verses, spreading their sweet scent as they rock to and fro. Yes, we’re sure this was his motivation. Continue reading Lachenalia, the flowering harmony

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I simply adore daffodils.

By the time I arrive at the end of August, I’m tired of the cold, drab world. I’ve had enough of thick socks and boots. I want to fling all the windows open and sit at my desk without a heater, scarf, beanie, blanket and leaden fingers. I want a world that is dust free and washed clean. I long for the rain (Highveld dwellers are parched by the end of winter) and I yearn for fresh new greens and bright colours. Continue reading I simply adore daffodils.

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Hyacinth – fit for a queen

There’s never been any doubt that Marie Antoinette, Queen of France from 1774 to 1792, had a great penchant for beautiful things. This love of beauty extended to flowers. The Palace of Versailles was always filled to its golden extremes with an abundance of sweet-smelling blooms, she decorated her outlandish hairstyles with petals and her clothing and accessories were all scented with floral notes. It’s no wonder that the hyacinth, with its strong, sweet, heady aroma and long-lasting flowers, was often incorporated in her perfumes and placed in her vases, thanks to a daily delivery of hundreds of hyacinths to the palace from the Netherlands, as ordered by her husband, King Louis XVI. Continue reading Hyacinth – fit for a queen