Haemanthus deformis – 5 bulbs per pack

R110.00

Out of stock

Description

Family : Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis family)

A dense cluster of white flowers borne atop a short hairy stem and large, fleshy grey leaves make Haemanthus deformis one of South Africa ‘s most extraordinary bulbous plants. Although poorly known in cultivation, its preference for shade and ease of culture make it an invaluable subject for the gardener and specialist bulb-grower alike.

A dense cluster of white flowers borne atop a short hairy stem and large, fleshy grey leaves make Haemanthus deformis one of South Africa ‘s most extraordinary bulbous plants. Although poorly known in cultivation, its preference for shade and ease of culture make it an invaluable subject for the gardener and specialist bulb-grower alike.

Description
Haemanthus deformis is an evergreen bulbous plant with thick fleshy roots and two or four broad, grey or greenish grey leaves that are spreading or lie flat on the ground. The leaves are fleshy and have hairy margins. The mature plant reaches up to 120 mm high in flower and produces a single thick, bent, short, hairy flower stem in the centre, between the leaf bases.

The flower head consists of a dense cluster of erect, white individual flowers with white filaments and bright yellow anthers, and prominent long, white, protruding styles. The flowers are enclosed by broad, strong white bracts that are distinctly recurved in the upper part. The fruit is a fleshy, dark orange berry containing a few hard, oblong seeds.

Haemanthus deformis presents no great difficulty in cultivation. In temperate climates it is most suitably grown in semi-shaded to fully shaded positions such as on a patio in pots with a diameter of at least 25 cm, in raised beds or rock gardens. In countries with cold winter climates, they are best grown in containers in a cool or slightly heated greenhouse. Plant the bulbs with the neck at, or just below soil level in a well-drained, slightly acid medium comprising equal parts of well decomposed compost or finely milled bark, and river or silica sand. The plants must have at least partial shade and thrive in even heavy shade. Water the plants heavily once per week during the summer growing period, but reduce watering in winter to once every two weeks.

Propagate the plants by offsets or from seed. Offsets are rather slow to form, and are best separated from the mother bulb straight after flowering, just as the new leaves begin to develop. Sow the seeds as soon as they are easily removed from the dark orange, ripe berries. Place the berries in a bowl of water and remove the sticky outer pulp, thus exposing the seeds. Clean the seeds in the water and allow to dry for about an hour. Sow the seeds in seed trays in the same medium recommended for adult bulbs, and cover with a sowing medium to a depth of up to 5 mm. Seeds may take up to two months before the first leaf appears above ground, and a further four to five years to flower for the first time.

The bulbs and leaf bases of Haemanthus deformis are susceptible to attack by mealy bugs, and the leaf margins are chewed by snout beetles at night.

When grown in the garden, Haemanthus deformis makes an excellent companion subject to other shade-loving plants such as Clivia caulescens, Dracaena aletriformis and Drimiopsis maculata.

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